toewscrosby:

*easter on 4/20*

image

tockthewatchdog:

mattheuphonium:

kim-jong-chill:

i need feminism because when jesus does a magic trick it’s a goddamn miracle but when a woman does a magic trick she gets burned at the stake

fabulous 

i mean they did also kill jesus. that was a pretty significant thing that happened. like i understand where you’re coming from here but they very much did kill jesus.

rionhunter:

I made a response to this, but unfortunately, tumblr has a way of eating up anything more than 10 lines long, and it got a little lost.  So, even though I’m not Hank, I thought I would make a full post explaining the science. 
To understand why it’s happening, though, I’m going to have to quickly explain to you what is happening first.Hopefully we all know that animation (and film) is just a collection of images, flashed in quick succession.  The motion that we see, however, is pieced together in our brains, thanks to a thing called ‘persistence of vision’.Persistence of Vision is caused by the lag in your brain.  Seriously.That brief instant it takes for your brain to understand what it’s seeing is the reason you’re able to watch movies.  And we should be thankful for that brief instant.Light comes into your eyeballs, and it’s crazy hectic data.  There’s so much stuff happening all the time everywhere.  And while our brains are good, they can’t process everything they’re seeing at light speed.  Everything we perceive through our retinas is just light, bouncing off other things.  We all know that, but it’s something we often forget.The brain processes one instant of reality, then a snapshot of the next, and then the next, and so on, and pieces them together to create motion.
This is everything.  This is your entire reality.  The perception of instances blended together to form a delicious smoothy of senses.
For motion to be consistent, however, what it’s seeing needs to resemble what it was seeing the moment before.  For example, for objectX to look like it’s moving, it needs to mostly be where it was the microsecond before, but slightly not.Basically, you need to think about those ol’ claymations kids make, where the lego slowly edges fowards.  You need to take that concept, and apply it to everything you’ve ever known and loved. If objectX doesn’t overlap where it was before, it’ll look liked it appeared there out of nowhere or a whole new objectX.  This is when the illusion of movement is broken.  It doesn’t occur in live-action movies or reality as much, because it’s hard to break the illusion of reality when you’re in reality, whereas to create a realistic perception of reality, from nothing, on a screen?Yeah, a little trickier.In an industry setting, animators have to create at least 25 frames for every second of footage (FPS).  And sometimes, in that 25 frames, animators need to have something move so fast on a frame, that it doesn’t overlap its previous self.

Their solution, as you probably know, is to stretch and contort their object in a way that’s not dissimilar from motion blur with cameras.  Especially when you acknowledge that motion blur is everything that’s happening for that 1/25th of a second.Again, a lot of this is common knowledge, but it’s a matter of how it all pieces together to work.
As you can see here, in figure A, the hotdogs are smoothly sliding out at a consistent speed, which means, if you were to mark each spot they were in every frame, the marks would make a straight line.The intervals between each marking isn’t very much, because they’re moving quite slowly.  The hotdogs are mostly overlapping themselves between each frame.Now remember that the illusion of movement is all in your brain, where it looks for something that resembled the instant before, and projects trajectory into your concious.
The only reason you’re able to reverse the flow of hotdogs is because they look so similar, and because it’s literally all in your head.When you make yourself think the flow of hotdogs is going into this fine gentleman’s pants, you’re making yourself believe that, in one frame, hotdogX moves almost a whole hotdog length down, instead of only a little bit of a hotdog length up.And because it’s almost a whole hotdog length down, in just one frame, the distance of the intervals along the hotdog’s trajectory increases, which means it travels more distance in the same amount of time. In that one instance of perceived reality (IPR)(Don’t use that anywhere serious, I just made that up), the hotdog moves 9 pixels, instead of 2 (approx.)(I’m not going to count them)So, to summarize the answer to your question (aka TL:DR);The reason why the ‘dogs fly into his pants faster is because your brain lag enables you to perceive motion through light  (it likes things that look the same).  And when things look the same, you can screw with your brain something hardcore. When you force your brain to see things at different intervals, it can change how you perceive them.
rionhunter:

I made a response to this, but unfortunately, tumblr has a way of eating up anything more than 10 lines long, and it got a little lost.  So, even though I’m not Hank, I thought I would make a full post explaining the science. 
To understand why it’s happening, though, I’m going to have to quickly explain to you what is happening first.Hopefully we all know that animation (and film) is just a collection of images, flashed in quick succession.  The motion that we see, however, is pieced together in our brains, thanks to a thing called ‘persistence of vision’.Persistence of Vision is caused by the lag in your brain.  Seriously.That brief instant it takes for your brain to understand what it’s seeing is the reason you’re able to watch movies.  And we should be thankful for that brief instant.Light comes into your eyeballs, and it’s crazy hectic data.  There’s so much stuff happening all the time everywhere.  And while our brains are good, they can’t process everything they’re seeing at light speed.  Everything we perceive through our retinas is just light, bouncing off other things.  We all know that, but it’s something we often forget.The brain processes one instant of reality, then a snapshot of the next, and then the next, and so on, and pieces them together to create motion.
This is everything.  This is your entire reality.  The perception of instances blended together to form a delicious smoothy of senses.
For motion to be consistent, however, what it’s seeing needs to resemble what it was seeing the moment before.  For example, for objectX to look like it’s moving, it needs to mostly be where it was the microsecond before, but slightly not.Basically, you need to think about those ol’ claymations kids make, where the lego slowly edges fowards.  You need to take that concept, and apply it to everything you’ve ever known and loved. If objectX doesn’t overlap where it was before, it’ll look liked it appeared there out of nowhere or a whole new objectX.  This is when the illusion of movement is broken.  It doesn’t occur in live-action movies or reality as much, because it’s hard to break the illusion of reality when you’re in reality, whereas to create a realistic perception of reality, from nothing, on a screen?Yeah, a little trickier.In an industry setting, animators have to create at least 25 frames for every second of footage (FPS).  And sometimes, in that 25 frames, animators need to have something move so fast on a frame, that it doesn’t overlap its previous self.

Their solution, as you probably know, is to stretch and contort their object in a way that’s not dissimilar from motion blur with cameras.  Especially when you acknowledge that motion blur is everything that’s happening for that 1/25th of a second.Again, a lot of this is common knowledge, but it’s a matter of how it all pieces together to work.
As you can see here, in figure A, the hotdogs are smoothly sliding out at a consistent speed, which means, if you were to mark each spot they were in every frame, the marks would make a straight line.The intervals between each marking isn’t very much, because they’re moving quite slowly.  The hotdogs are mostly overlapping themselves between each frame.Now remember that the illusion of movement is all in your brain, where it looks for something that resembled the instant before, and projects trajectory into your concious.
The only reason you’re able to reverse the flow of hotdogs is because they look so similar, and because it’s literally all in your head.When you make yourself think the flow of hotdogs is going into this fine gentleman’s pants, you’re making yourself believe that, in one frame, hotdogX moves almost a whole hotdog length down, instead of only a little bit of a hotdog length up.And because it’s almost a whole hotdog length down, in just one frame, the distance of the intervals along the hotdog’s trajectory increases, which means it travels more distance in the same amount of time. In that one instance of perceived reality (IPR)(Don’t use that anywhere serious, I just made that up), the hotdog moves 9 pixels, instead of 2 (approx.)(I’m not going to count them)So, to summarize the answer to your question (aka TL:DR);The reason why the ‘dogs fly into his pants faster is because your brain lag enables you to perceive motion through light  (it likes things that look the same).  And when things look the same, you can screw with your brain something hardcore. When you force your brain to see things at different intervals, it can change how you perceive them.

rionhunter:

I made a response to this, but unfortunately, tumblr has a way of eating up anything more than 10 lines long, and it got a little lost.  So, even though I’m not Hank, I thought I would make a full post explaining the science. 

To understand why it’s happening, though, I’m going to have to quickly explain to you what is happening first.

Hopefully we all know that animation (and film) is just a collection of images, flashed in quick succession.  The motion that we see, however, is pieced together in our brains, thanks to a thing called ‘persistence of vision’.

Persistence of Vision is caused by the lag in your brain.  Seriously.
That brief instant it takes for your brain to understand what it’s seeing is the reason you’re able to watch movies.  And we should be thankful for that brief instant.

Light comes into your eyeballs, and it’s crazy hectic data.  There’s so much stuff happening all the time everywhere.  And while our brains are good, they can’t process everything they’re seeing at light speed.  Everything we perceive through our retinas is just light, bouncing off other things.  We all know that, but it’s something we often forget.

The brain processes one instant of reality, then a snapshot of the next, and then the next, and so on, and pieces them together to create motion.

This is everything.  This is your entire reality.  The perception of instances blended together to form a delicious smoothy of senses.

For motion to be consistent, however, what it’s seeing needs to resemble what it was seeing the moment before.  For example, for objectX to look like it’s moving, it needs to mostly be where it was the microsecond before, but slightly not.

Basically, you need to think about those ol’ claymations kids make, where the lego slowly edges fowards.  You need to take that concept, and apply it to everything you’ve ever known and loved.

If objectX doesn’t overlap where it was before, it’ll look liked it appeared there out of nowhere or a whole new objectX.  This is when the illusion of movement is broken.  It doesn’t occur in live-action movies or reality as much, because it’s hard to break the illusion of reality when you’re in reality, whereas to create a realistic perception of reality, from nothing, on a screen?

Yeah, a little trickier.

In an industry setting, animators have to create at least 25 frames for every second of footage (FPS).  And sometimes, in that 25 frames, animators need to have something move so fast on a frame, that it doesn’t overlap its previous self.

Their solution, as you probably know, is to stretch and contort their object in a way that’s not dissimilar from motion blur with cameras.  Especially when you acknowledge that motion blur is everything that’s happening for that 1/25th of a second.

Again, a lot of this is common knowledge, but it’s a matter of how it all pieces together to work.

As you can see here, in figure A, the hotdogs are smoothly sliding out at a consistent speed, which means, if you were to mark each spot they were in every frame, the marks would make a straight line.

The intervals between each marking isn’t very much, because they’re moving quite slowly.  The hotdogs are mostly overlapping themselves between each frame.

Now remember that the illusion of movement is all in your brain, where it looks for something that resembled the instant before, and projects trajectory into your concious.

The only reason you’re able to reverse the flow of hotdogs is because they look so similar, and because it’s literally all in your head.

When you make yourself think the flow of hotdogs is going into this fine gentleman’s pants, you’re making yourself believe that, in one frame, hotdogX moves almost a whole hotdog length down, instead of only a little bit of a hotdog length up.

And because it’s almost a whole hotdog length down, in just one frame, the distance of the intervals along the hotdog’s trajectory increases, which means it travels more distance in the same amount of time. 

In that one instance of perceived reality (IPR)(Don’t use that anywhere serious, I just made that up), the hotdog moves 9 pixels, instead of 2 (approx.)(I’m not going to count them)

So, to summarize the answer to your question (aka TL:DR);

The reason why the ‘dogs fly into his pants faster is because your brain lag enables you to perceive motion through light  (it likes things that look the same).  And when things look the same, you can screw with your brain something hardcore. 
When you force your brain to see things at different intervals, it can change how you perceive them.

bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.
bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.

bright-end-of-nowhere:

The only two reactions to this realization.

(Source: viickodin)

Arrow cast + being adorable idiots

(Source: olicitysmoaks)

surprisebitch:

this needs to happen

surprisebitch:

this needs to happen

(Source: fuckyeahreligionpigeon)

paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.
paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down
A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.

paperseverywhere:

He’s never gonna live it down

A bit late, but happy birthday you doof.

starsandatoms:

okay though if there’s anything that struck me on rewatching the first Cap movie it’s how much Steve and Bucky are such assholes to each other and it’s amazing

and like can you just imagine recovered!Bucky and Steve going on missions together and Steve being like

"wow Buck…

starksgrace:

lyssalovescookies:

flailmorpho:

wastelandbabe:

lowbutt:

MY SCIENCE TEACHER CAUGHT THE TABLE ON FIRE AND HES JUST STARING AT IT

I LOVE SCIENCE TEACHERS

I’M SORRY BUT HOW BADLY DID HE FUCK UP READING HIS CALIPER?

My Bio teacher had a balloon and he’s like “I’m going to pop it with this match if you look closely you might see a spark” so he popped it and nothing happened right? so he filled another balloon and had a kid turn off the light and everybody leaned forward to make sure they caught it this time and he popped it again and… there was a fireball and it left soot on the ceiling that was still there when I graduated two years later. 2 girls fell out of their chairs, three of the guys screamed

…also he sat on his glass top desk once and broke it

tojothethief:

Just bull things. 

       Gods be good, why would any man ever want to be king? When everyone was shouting King in the North, King in the North, I told myself … s w o r e to myself … that I would be a good king, as honorable as Father, strong, just, loyal to my friends and brave when I faced my enemies … now I can’t even tell one from the other.
               How did it all get so confused?

(Source: palpattine)

"It’s not going to happen like you think it will, like you want it to, or how you planned it would when you were five years old. There will be no mood lighting or dramatic background music or any special effects. There won’t be a sunrise or a gentle breeze, and there definitely won’t be any heavy rain that falls around you so hard against the thunder that you can barely hear each other speak. It won’t be seen by thousands of people, it won’t end wars, and it won’t change lives around the world. But it will change yours, and it will be perfect to you, despite the absence of candlelight and soft jazz. It will be perfect because you were nine when you had your first crush and he was mean to you and called you names and ran away from you in the playground. Because you were twelve when you sat next to the coolest boy in school in English class and he ignored you everyday and only laughed when you answered a question right and talked to the girl sitting behind him instead. Because you were fifteen when you slept with the boy who promised he’d take you to prom and never did and he never said you looked pretty or called you the next day. And because you were eighteen when all of your friends were always too busy with their boyfriends and being told they were loved and there was a very significant part of you that wondered if there would ever come a time when you didn’t feel that lonely. That is why it will be perfect. It will be perfect because it’s everything you’ve been waiting for. It won’t be like any other day, and you’ll know the difference then too because, that day, blues will appear bluer and pinks pinker and greens greener, songs will sound softer and flowers will smell sweeter and the air will feel warmer, even though absolutely everything looks and smells and feels the same to everyone else, everyone who isn’t experiencing it. Because it’s happening to you. There might not be a big musical number where everyone joins in without question and there won’t be someone narrating while it happens, but your cheeks will flush and your heart will race and your knees with shake because the feeling is new and exciting and rare and beautiful. And it will answer all of your questions. It will tell you why you were ignored at nine and mocked at twelve and used at fifteen and forgotten about at eighteen. It will tell you why you felt so lonely that day, why you spent countless nights curled up in your bed, why you cried for months over a phone call that never came and, ultimately, why your mom brushed your hair back one night and said, “Just you wait.” You’ll understand all of that stuff right then, in that moment. The sadness that once pushed down on you like a weight will be lifted and you’ll realise why all of that had to happen. Because your hands will brush and your bag will fall from your shoulder and you’ll quickly turn back with only a second to catch your breath and apologise before he turns around, too. And then, without knowing your name, your age, where you come from or where you’re going, he will instantly believe that you are the loveliest girl he’s ever laid eyes on, although flustered and red in the face and in a hurry. Then he’ll take a step toward you and he’ll say something amazing. It won’t be “You’re everything I’ve been looking for” or “I think we were destined to bump into one another today”, but something greater, a little fragile, and even more perfect than you could have ever imagined at five years old, dressing up in your mother’s clothes and making your Barbie’s kiss. He will smile faintly, clear his throat, and all he will say is, “Hello.”"

'This Is How You Will Fall In Love'

*I realise that this has been done before, but I have taken the idea and rewritten it all by myself because this is how I picture it. The same, but with a little more of me. I take no credit for the original, just this.

(via these-greatexpectations)

professorelupin:

fuckyeahprettybooks:

lovejoyjohnlock:

I’m twelve years old again.

Someone help me stop laughing, it hurts.

image

(Source: hpinsults)

(Source: ehnotquite)